LANGUAGE COGNITIVISM AND KNOWLEDGE PRODUCTION IN AFRICA: A DECONSTRUCTIVE DISCOURSE

Authors

  • Abigail Olubukola, Irele (Ph. D) Department of Mass Communication and Media Technology, Lead City University, Ibadan Nigeria

Keywords:

Decolonization, Post-colonial Africa, Indigenous languages, African universities, Cultural identity, Epistemic diversity,

Abstract

This paper delves into the critical role of language in knowledge production, with a focus on its implications within post-colonial Africa. It examines language as a conduit for cultural expression and understanding, emphasizing its significance in shaping thought processes and societal dynamics. Through the perspectives of prominent scholars such as Ngugi wa Thiong'o and Kwasi Wiredu, the paper highlights the pressing need to decolonize African minds and educational systems by prioritizing indigenous languages. Central to the discourse is the argument that the imposition of European metropolitan languages in educational curricula perpetuates a colonial legacy that undermines African cultural identity and agency. By marginalizing indigenous languages, African societies face linguistic hegemony that hampers their ability to express and transmit knowledge in authentic ways. The paper advocates for a pluriverse approach to knowledge production, which recognizes and values diverse epistemic traditions. It urges African universities to lead efforts in repositioning African languages within educational frameworks, thereby challenging the dominance of Western cognitive systems. Through linguistic diversity and inclusivity, African universities can foster a more equitable intellectual landscape that respects and incorporates the contributions of all cultures. In today's interconnected world, characterized by digital globalization, the reclamation of African languages becomes paramount in ensuring the representation and participation of African voices in the global discourse. By embracing linguistic diversity, African societies can assert their cultural sovereignty and contribute meaningfully to the construction of a more inclusive and pluriversal knowledge ecosystem.

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Published

2024-05-22

How to Cite

Irele , A. O. (2024). LANGUAGE COGNITIVISM AND KNOWLEDGE PRODUCTION IN AFRICA: A DECONSTRUCTIVE DISCOURSE. Advance Journal of Linguistics and Mass Communication, 8(3), 13–23. Retrieved from https://aspjournals.org/Journals/index.php/Ajlmc/article/view/645

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